Can I fit a Camp Stretcher in that Tent?

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There are some clear benefits to using a stretcher in your tent.

It not only gets you up off the ground, something appreciated by older campers; it increases storage space.

Two king-sized mattresses in a 3-4 person tent leaves little room for your gear. But put a couple of stretchers in the tent, and you still have space underneath.

The only sticking point is that a stretcher and mattress of the same length and width, will not necessarily fit into the same tent.

The combination of stretcher height (45cm in my experiment) and a sloping tent wall meant that some measurements I took in our tent display reduced the space for a stretcher by up to 45cm.

How do you find a stretcher and tent combination that will work?

Keeping in mind the flexible nature of a tent wall, I have come up with a guide based on an average stretcher height of 45cm lightly touching the interior walls.

To work out if your stretcher will fit in a tent you are researching, reduce the tent floor dimensions by these measurements for each sloped wall that your stretcher will be situated against.

Stretcher Length Formula

15cm for boxy touring and cabin style tents

Examples:

20cm for 3-4 person dome tents

Examples:

25cm for the extended room on touring tents

Examples:

30cm for the bedrooms of family dome tents

Examples:

35cm for Oztent RV tents

Examples:

45cm for the extended room on Oxley & Jet Tents

Examples:

These measurements are not a sure thing for every tent. But this will at least get you in the ballpark when shopping online.

Stretcher with sleeping bag and pillow in tent

Protecting your tent floor

We often get asked is if a stretcher will put holes in tent floors. Common sense says that the feet of a stretcher will be much harder on a tent floor than a mattress would be. This is because all the weight is concentrated to just a few square centimetres of space.

Whilst it is very dependant on the surface type on which your tent is pitched, you can minimise damage by using a tarp under your tent, and possibly even some foam mats inside for lighter weight floor fabrics.

Hopefully, this helps you to confidently select the gear you need to sleep comfortably on your next camping trip.

What are some of your recommendations for making your tent a comfortable sleeping space?

About the writer...

Ben Collaton

Trekker, surfer, climber, mountain biker, runner, camper. Participator in most things… master of none.

Joined back in March, 2013

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